Wednesday, February 13, 2013

Valentine's Day Montessori Shelves

I stole a bit of time tonight after my little ones were in asleep to set up their Valentine's Day shelf for tomorrow's big day. I don't promise good pictures, since I was taking them so late and haven't doctored them at all, but I do promise some pictures.

This year I used only materials that I had on-hand to create the learning space. I used many of the classic Montessori materials that coordinated with the theme (you'll see the pink tower and the red rods, for example), but I added a few other fun things from the craft closet as well.

Come back here or to my Facebook page tomorrow because I'll be posting throughout the day about all the other activities we have planned that didn't make it into my Montessori shelves post tonight. I promise fun and laughter! (Think scavenger hunts and themed foods...)

Here's the set up, as of tonight:



We did the "H is for Heart" activity from I Can Teach My Child earlier in the week and put our results up on the bulletin board for a festive touch. The kids were so proud and I really loved the activity right along with them. The sunshine is leftover from an old bulletin board theme, but I love it so much (the children cut it out from old finger painting projects) that I simply don't ever take it down.

The books are our own, pulled out and put on the shelf for the occasion. The sign, though difficult to read in this picture, reads "Happy Valentines Day!"

You can't see the windows well in this photo, but I decorated both school room windows like this, earlier in the week:
In the left corner of the shelf photo, you can see our new felted heart mobile. I used this tutorial from The Magic Onions, and simply put the finished product onto a fallen tree branch. The children created all the hearts, with finishing touches and ribbons from mom. The collaboration was beautiful and we are thoroughly enjoying the ease of felting lately! I bought the wool roving and felting needles from Bella Luna Toys.


The pink tower and red rods are in the shelf mix this time around since their colors are irresistible for a V-Day theme, plus I used the red knobless cylinders to create this work:

(In case you can't tell, I traced the knobs into the shape of a heart, and the little ones will try to assemble it just so.)

Other works in this presentation include a popsicle stick pattern work, with some idea cards that I made with markers and index cards;

a small clothespin attachment work (the small clothespins are really quite a challenge for little hands, so if you give this a try at home you might consider using large pins for littler hands);
 a button spooning transfer work;
a pom pom spooning transfer work for my toddler;
a number sequencing work on foam hearts (I may also do some hop-to-the-number type games with this tomorrow);
some themed lacing cards;
and some large wooden color sorting work for my toddler.
To that I will add some selected printables (letter mazes, size gradations and cutting practice) from the V-Day Preschool Pack from Over The Big Moon.

Check out my Valentine's Day Pinterest board and my Montessori Moms Shared Pinterest Board for more inspiration!

Happy learning!

5 comments:

  1. I have never understood how felting works. One more thing that the munchkins can do that is over my head!

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    1. You know, I avoided it for a long time because I just wasn't sure how it was supposed to work either. I was pleasantly surprised to find that it's simple and very fun. The felting needles have tiny barbs on the ends of them, which agitate the scaly surface of wool, binding it together. All you have to do is stick the wool with the needle a million times, pushing it into the shape you want, and eventually the wool fibers attach completely to one another and you have a lovely little toy. We also use soap and hands to make felted balls, but I much prefer the flexibility of needle felting. You can make such neat stuff!

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